FTO

Sgt Kleeman's FTO Training School

The mission of standards and training is to enhance the professionalism of public safety in serving the community. The Field Training Program was developed to support this mission. The role of the Field Training Officer (FTO) is a critical component of the Field Training Program. The primary responsibility of the program is to facilitate the transition process by supervising, training, and evaluating new employees in the initial application of their previously acquired knowledge and skills.

Any individual who becomes a Field Training Officer must commit himself/herself to the philosophy of teaching. He/she must realize that training is the first priority and that evaluation is secondary. The FTO should be willing to bear the responsibility for the progress of the new student or lack of it until he/she is sure that other non-controllable factors are the cause of the student's performance.

  • • 2000 Field Training Officer School
  • • 2010 FTO Manger
  • • 2016 FTO Coordinator
  • • 2017 FTO Advanced Training Course
  • • 2017 Kaminsky FTO Supervisor School
  • • 2017 Managing the Patrol FTO Program (IPTM)
  • • 2017 Think Clear for the FTO Course
  • • 2017 The Ultimate Training Officer Course
  • • 2018 Supervising and Managing the FTO Unit (PATC)
  • • 2018 The Transformational Trainer
  • • 2018 Master FTO - National Association of Field Training Officers
  • • 2018 Master Instructor – Indiana Law Enforcement Academy

FTO School Objectives

Here is a list of things FTO training can do for you...

  • • Principles of leadership
  • • Laws and principles of learning
  • • Methods of instruction
  • • Liability issues
  • • Daily Observation Reports
  • • Understand performance evaluations
  • • Reasons for a field training program
  • • Role of the FTO
  • • Performance errors
  • • Effective communication
  • • Job-related appraisal system
  • • Standardized training to all recruits
  • • Produce highly trained employees

Schedule

  • Lawrence, IN February 11-13, 2019
  • Evansville, IN February 20-22, 2019
  • Marion, IN March 18-20, 2019
  • Pendleton, IN April 1-3, 2019
  • South Bend, IN May 13-15, 2019
  • Lafayette, IN July 22-24, 2019
  • Clarksville, IN Sept. 16-18, 2019
  • About Me

    The mission of standards and training is to enhance the professionalism of public safety in serving the community. The Field Training Program was developed to support this mission. The role of the Field Training Officer (FTO) is a critical component of the Field Training Program. The primary responsibility of the program is to facilitate the transition process by supervising, training, and evaluating new employees in the initial application of their previously acquired knowledge and skills.

    Any individual who becomes a Field Training Officer must commit himself/herself to the philosophy of teaching. He/she must realize that training is the first priority and that evaluation is secondary. The FTO should be willing to bear the responsibility for the progress of the new student or lack of it until he/she is sure that other non-controllable factors are the cause of the student's performance.

    Stephen M. Kleeman is a sergeant with the Evansville Police Department. He started his law enforcement career in 1991 where he completed Basic Training and his Advanced Individual Training as a Military Police Officer in Army Reserves. He attended Vincennes University from 1992-1994 and graduated with an Associate’s Degree in Criminal Justice. He then began his civilian law enforcement career in Fort Branch and Graduated the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy in 1995 with class 95-120. In addition, in 1995, he became an ILEA general instructor and began his teaching experience. In 1997, he was hired by the Evansville Police Department and quickly became one of the instructors for the department. In 2000, he attended the Field Training Officer School and began his career training new recruits. In 2001, he expanded his knowledge on training recruits by attending and completing the Army Drill Sergeant School. Sgt. Kleeman was a motor patrol FTO for 10 years and even received the FTO of The Year award in 2002. He was transferred to the Field Training Unit in 2010 as a FTO manager and ran the Southwest Indiana Law Enforcement Academy until he was promoted to the rank of sergeant in 2016. Sgt. Kleeman then became a Motor Patrol Supervisor on third shift until he was asked to take over the Field Training Program. He is currently assigned to the Field Training Unit as the FTO coordinator, lead academy instructor and responsible for all of the less lethal programs. In 2018, he received his Indiana Law Enforcement Academy Master Instructor certification and recognized as a Master FTO through the National Association of Field Training Officer’s organization. Sgt. Kleeman is also an instructor in Firearms, Advanced EVO, STOPS, PepperBall, TASER, Below 100, Active Shooter, OC and Chemical Munitions, Less Lethal Impact Munitions and Mobile Field Force.

    This standardized program is an accumulation of the best aspects of existing field training programs. The program is designed with the following criteria in mind:

  • Defensible/Fair -- The program achieves defensibility and fairness by proper selection of FTO’s, a student officer feedback mechanism, a comprehensive list of training tasks and goals, and a standardized evaluation process.
  • Effective/Manageable- The program is performance-based and includes adequate documentation, minimum time completion requirements, and competency specifications.
  • Adaptable/Flexible -- The program is adaptable to any size or type of agency. Flexibility is afforded to incorporate agency-specific policies and procedures.
  • Commonly referred to as the “Field Training Officer Concept”, apprenticeship training is used for law enforcement, communications, and corrections personnel. Educators, administrators and other criminal justice practitioners are also encouraged to participate. Click the NAFTO emblem to learn more.

    FAQ

    A: The cost is $400 per student.

    A: The basic FTO School is three (3) days.

    A: All of the systems are talked about, but this course is geared towards the San Jose model.

    A: A classroom that is conducive for training. The classroom should be large enough to seat all the students (20-30 approx.), equipped with a computer for PowerPoint, screen and speakers.

    A: Yes. You will need a minimum of 12 students for the school. The school is posted on the ILEA off-sight training website and through social media, so it is easy to fill up a class.

    A: Yes, the hosting agency gets a free slot for having the school.

    A: The student will receive a FTO book and a certificate of completion.

    A: No.

    A: No. Several correction officers, dispatchers, fire fighters, security and EMT/paramedics companies use this program.

    Contact Me

    Reach out with any questions for Sgt Kleeman...

    Daytime Number: (812) 457-1597

    Contact Email Address: skleeman@evansvillepolice.com